Pikes Peak Genealogical Society
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Records: 1 to 7 of 7


Wednesday, November 20
Your New England Ancestors Living through the Revolution and Early Republic Years (1765-1815)  (Classes)
3:30 pm to 5:30 pm
Penrose Library - Aspen Room
Instructor: John Putnam
Recommended Minimum Experience Level: Advanced Beginner
Class Size: 25
Restrictions: Open to PPGS members only
Reservations: Required, e-mail instructor at jeputnam@aol.com
 
Did you have New England Ancestors living in New England immediately before, during, and after the American Revolution as well in the early years of the New Republic? Do you know their history and how they coped with the many historic disruptions during this time? Even though you may not share any roots from this geographical area, there are many factors that started in New England that still impact us all.
In many respects, New England was a catalyst of the Revolution, very active in the formation of the New Republic, the site of the start of the American industrial revolution and was the source of many people who emigrated west during this time.  John will share the importance to understand these events to improve your chances to tackle New England brick walls and to understand the very stressful times in which our ancestors lived.  While records are important to prove your genealogical past, it is often difficult to know where to look for these records unless you know the area’s history not to mention the formative activities that our ancestors undertook which provide rich stories for your family histories. Certainly, events as disruptive of these also can disrupt the records too.
 
John likes to customize his talks to his audiences. He asks that attendees share with him the following information:
1. What are your top 3-5 New England surnames and in what towns & states did they live during this time period?
2. Did any of your ancestors emigrate west during this time period? If yes, please provide brief details and to where they immigrated.
3. What information about New England during this time period would most benefit your research?
Please provide this information to jeputnam@aol.com show New England PPGS Part 2 in the Subject caption.


Thursday, November 21
Ethnicity: Why Is My Indian Princess Wearing a Kilt?  (Classes)
2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Penrose Library - Aspen Room
Instructor: Dr. Greg LIverman
Recommended Minimum Experience Level: Beginner. Some knowledge and experience with DNA testing is best.
Class Size: 25
Restrictions: Free. Open to the public.
Reservations: Required, e-mail instructor at greg.liverman@live.com
 
Presentation will include:
  • A brief DNA refresher
  • Our paleolithic kin: Neanderthals and Denisovans
  • Migration patterns of our ancient ancestors using Y-DNA, mtDNA, and atDNA
  • Interpreting "ethnicity" reports - what is ethnicity?
  • What do atDNA biogeographical admixture ("ethnicity") reports tell us?
  • Why is the report different from what I was told by me family? How does atDNA recombination effect the results?
  • Which companies report is right?
  • If time is available: Walk through of AncestryDNA, 23andMe, and LivingDNA


Sunday, November 24
Military Records in Depth  (Classes)
1:15 pm to 4:45 pm
21C Library, Room B6
Instructor: Suzanne Mulligan
Recommended Minimum Experience Level: Advanced Beginner
Class Size: 16
Restrictions: Open to PPGS members only
Reservations: Required, e-mail instructor at katderoet@gmail.com
 
Surprisingly few years in the Colonial and United States periods were without military conflict – some at a limited level, some worldwide. As a result, a large number of our ancestors are likely to have served during one or more conflicts; leaving behind military service records. In addition, many of our civilian ancestors participated in the cause by providing time, labor, and/or materials and others were effected by conflict directly (plantation burned down) or indirectly (rationing). This class will be a lecture about military records including:
  • A brief overview of Colonial/U.S. conflicts up to World War II
  • Finding military records and not finding military records – records disasters
  • Examples or records types available for the more common conflicts: Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Civil War, World War I, and World War II
  • Examples of records involving civilians



Friday, December 6
Connecting the Dots - Turning Indirect/Negative Evidence into a Conclusion  (Classes)
1:00 pm to 5:00 pm
East Library - Room F1
Instructor: Nancy Niles Wehner, CG
Recommended Minimum Experience Level: Intermediate
Class Size:16
Restrictions: Open to PPGS members only
Reservations: Required, e-mail instructor at ngwehner@gmail.com
 
There are times when it seems that an ancestor must have been dropped to Earth (or swept away therefrom) by aliens. No matter how hard you try, no matter how many records you search, nothing provides you with explicit information (direct evidence) on that ancestor’s parents, or what became of his children, etc. But even in the absence of such direct evidence, it is possible to arrive at valid conclusions using indirect evidence and negative evidence. This class will be a combined lecture and workshop about the thought processes and methods used to arrive at a genealogical conclusion in the absence of direct evidence. Included will be:
  • A review of source types, information types, and evidence types
  • How the Genealogical Proof Standard and Genealogy Standards play into reaching a valid conclusion
  • How to proceed to reach a conclusion
  • Proofs: Statements, arguments, and summaries
  • Conflicting evidence and what to do about it
.



Saturday, February 1, 2020
Introduction to Genealogy  (Classes)
10:00 am to 2:00 pm
Penrose Library - Columbine A
Instructor: Nancy Niles Wehner, CG
Recommended Minimum Experience Level: Beginner
Class Size: 30+
Restrictions: None. Open to the public.
Reservations: Required; call 719-531-6333 ext. 2253 or to register online go to https://ppld.librarymarket.com/introduction-genealogy-finding-your-family-history
Additional: Bring snacks and/or a lunch, as we will not be taking a break long enough for you to go out and eat.
 
Exploration of the methods and records used in researching your family history. Includes discussions of:
  • ​Why genealogy?
  • Setting goals
  • Getting organized
  • Recording information
  • Common record types
  • Where to find records



Saturday, May 23, 2020
Introduction to Genealogy  (Classes)
10:00 am to 2:00 pm
East Library - East Community Meeting Room
Instructor: Nancy Niles Wehner, CG
Recommended Minimum Experience Level: Beginner
Class Size: 100
Restrictions: None. Open to the public.
Reservations: Required; call 719-531-6333 ext. 2253 or to register online go to https://ppld.librarymarket.com/introduction-genealogy-finding-your-family-history
Additional: Bring snacks and/or a lunch, as we will not be taking a break long enough for you to go out and eat.
 
Exploration of the methods and records used in researching your family history. Includes discussions of:
  • ​Why genealogy?
  • Setting goals
  • Getting organized
  • Recording information
  • Common record types
  • Where to find records



Saturday, September 19, 2020
Introduction to Genealogy  (Classes)
10:00 am to 2:00 pm
Penrose Library - Columbine A
Instructor: Nancy Niles Wehner, CG
Recommended Minimum Experience Level: Beginner
Class Size: 100
Restrictions: None. Open to the public.
Reservations: Required; call 719-531-6333 ext. 2253 or to register online go to https://ppld.librarymarket.com/introduction-genealogy-finding-your-family-history
Additional: Bring snacks and/or a lunch, as we will not be taking a break long enough for you to go out and eat.
 
Exploration of the methods and records used in researching your family history. Includes discussions of:
  • ​Why genealogy?
  • Setting goals
  • Getting organized
  • Recording information
  • Common record types
  • Where to find records